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AN to SAE Chart

AN sizes, originally developed for use by the U.S. Armed forces ("A" for army and "N" for navy), describe the outside diameter (O.D.) of tubing in 1/16-inch increments. For example, an AN 2 fitting will fit a tube with an O.D. of 2/16", or 1/8", while an AN 8 fitting will fit a tube with an O.D. of 8/16", or 1/2". Because the actual thickness of tube walls can vary from brand to brand, the inside diameter of a tube is not used as a reference. You will also find the dash (-) symbol or the word "dash" itself used in conjunction with AN sizes. A "dash six" fitting translates to AN-6.

-AN
SIZE
Hose/Tube
O.D. Inches
Closest SAE
Thread Size
-2 1/8" 5/16-24
-3 3/16" 3/8-24
-4 1/4" 7/16-20
-5 5/16" 1/2-20
-6 3/8" 9/16-18
-8 1/2" 3/4-16
-10 5/8" 7/8-14
-12 3/4" 1-1/16-12
-16 1" 1-5/16-12
-20 1-1/4" 1-5/8-12
-24 1-1/2" 1-7/8-12
-28 1-3/4" 2-1/4-12
-32 2" 2-1/2-12
NOTE: A sealer is NOT required for "AN" type fittings.

"NPT" Thread Sizes (National Pipe Taper)

NPT sizes are the most commonly used fitting sizes for general plumbing, piping, and tubing use; not quite as popular as AN for automotive use, but still very common. While AN fittings depend on the outside diameter of a tube for sizing, NPT fittings depend on the interior diameter (I.D.) of the fitting itself. The following chart shows the each size's thread-per-inch count, the I.D. of the fitting, and the AN fitting size with the closest-matching I.D. (inside dimension).

Pipe
Thread Size
Threads
Per Inch
App. Interior
Diameter
Closest
AN Size
1/16" 27 1/16" 2
1/8" 27 1/8" 4
1/4" 18 1/4" 6
3/8" 18 3/8" 8
1/2" 14 1/2" 10
3/4" 14 3/4" 12
1" 11-1/2 1" 16
1-1/4" 11-1/2 1-1/4" 20
1-1/2" 11-1/2 1-1/2" 24
2 11-1/2 2" 32
NOTE: A sealer is required for "NPT" type fittings.

How To: Replace Brakes & Rotors

Worn, grooved, or damaged brake discs will dramatically affect stopping distance and can also cause severe vibrations in the steering wheel when brakes are applied, causing loss of control under hard braking. For even the most novice mechanic, this is a simple DIY job that can be completed with common hand tools.

Materials Needed

  • Low profile jack
  • Jack stands
  • 15 mm socket and ratchet (caliper bolts)
  • 16/18 mm wrench (rear/front caliper bolt collar)
  • 13/16" socket and 1/2" ratchet
  • Loctite
  • Hammer
  • Screwdriver
  • Brake cleaner
  • Torque wrench
  • C-clamp or caliper reset tool

Step 1 – Loosen lug nuts, jack vehicle and remove wheel

Using the jacking points in front of the rear wheels or behind the front wheels, raise the car enough to remove the wheel. Never jack the car using suspension components or any part of the body as this may cause damage. It is also recommended that you use either a small block of wood or jacking pucks. Once the car is raised properly, place jack stands under the vehicle.

Figure 1. Lifting/jacking diagram for the C6.

Step 2 – Check the fluid in the master cylinder

Caliper decompression is necessary and it will force brake fluid back into the master cylinder, so either remove some fluid (if necessary) or secure shop rags around the master cylinder for potential overflow. Leave the cover off the master cylinder, so that you will not be working against the pressure of a closed system.

Figure 2. Check the fluid in the master cylinder.

Step 3 – FRONT BRAKES Loosen the caliper bolts

The caliper is mounted to the carrier via two 22mm bolts on the backside of the hub. These are large bolts and on there quite tight (70 ft./lb.) so a larger ratchet, or breaker bar would be a good idea here. Remove these two bolts and you should be able to wiggle the caliper off the rotor. Mind your brake lines, and don't pull too hard! With the caliper free, there is nothing securing the rotor to the hub, so if it feels like it's going to slide off, just remove it and set it aside for now.

  • Figure 3. Location of caliper bolts on backside of hub.
  • Figure 4. Wiggle caliper off rotor, mind your brake lines!

Step 4 – Compress the pistons

The standard C6 calipers utilize a two-piston design, with both pistons being on the hub-side of the caliper, as opposed to one piston on each side. This is a bit less efficient for extreme performance situation, but it is easy to service! The brake pads should now be free to be removed. Remove the outer pad, and leave the inside pad intact. As brake pads wear, the brake caliper pistons extend further out to keep pressure against the pads the rotors. New pads are much thicker, and will not all fit in the caliper along with the rotor without compressing those pistons. Use a C-clamp and press against the inside brake pad and the outside of the caliper. Exerting this pressure on the pad will compress the pistons simultaneously, as opposed to trying to compress one at a time, which could damage the calipers if done incorrectly. Tighten the clamp slowly until the two pistons are compressed just short of all the way in. Compressing the pistons will allow more room for the new, thick pads to fit around the rotor.

  • Figure 5. Remove the outer brake pad.
  • Figure 6. Use a C-clamp against the inside pad to compress the caliper pistons.

Warning

Do not let the caliper hang and create tension on the brake line. This could damage the brake line and cause premature failure. Either secure the caliper using wire or rope to hang without tension, or rest it on a box/crate placed under the car.

Step 5 – Clean and apply lube

At this point, inspect all brake parts and use brake cleaner to clean the system of brake dust and debris. Before installing the new the pads, apply brake lube (dry film) to the the backing plate of the new pads.

Figure 7. Lubricate the brake pads thoroughly.

Warning

Do not allow lubricant to contact the rotor or face of the pads. This is important as friction creates stopping power and lubricant will decrease friction. Also, do not overdo it as excess lubricant may drip onto those parts.

Step 6 – Remove disc

If still present from the factory, remove the spring washers from the wheel studs using a flat screwdriver and discard as these will not have to be reused. At this point the disc should slide freely over the wheel studs; some light tapping on the rear with a hammer may be necessary.

  • Figure 3. Indication of a bad brake disc.
  • Figure 4. Remove the disc.

Step 7 – Install new rotors

At this point, it's time to install the new brake rotor. Be sure to inspect the wheel bearing flange for rust or debris and, if necessary, clean. Slide the new disc over the wheel studs and clean any fingerprints or grease from the disc using brake cleaner. Next, re-install the caliper mounting bracket using Loctite and torque to 125 ft/lbs. 

Figure 5. A new disc installed.

Step 8 – Install the new pads and place the caliper in place

Make sure that the friction side of the new pads faces the rotor, both inboard and outboard. Make sure to position the pad wear sensor, located on the inboard pad, so that it is in the trailing position as the brake pad wears and moves forward toward the rotor.

Slide the caliper, with pads around the rotor. If you didn't compress the pistons enough, this will prove difficult. If you need to further compress the pistons, utilize the same C-clamp method and then try again. With the caliper secured around the rotor, reconnect the two large caliper-carrier bolts to approximately 70 ft./lbs., or "pretty snug," and you should be done.

Figure 8. Refitting the caliper to the rotor and hub.

Step 9 – Repeat this procedure on the other side

Repeat the process for the other side completing axle set. Check the master cylinder as the fluid level may have changed. As brake pads wear, the brake fluid level may appear lower, as the caliper pistons are pushed further out. Fresh brake pads keep the pistons from traveling as far, which tends to push the brake fluid back into the reservoir, raising the level.

Step 10 – REAR BRAKES Loosen bolts and compress pistons

Using 15mm and 18mm wrenches or sockets, loosen the caliper guide pin bolts located on the inboard side of the caliper.

Since the caliper position adjusts as the pads wear, they will need to be decompressed to allow for the space necessary for the new thicker pad.

  1. To compress pistons before removing caliper, place a large C-clamp over the caliper body and center it, so that the force is evenly distributed. Use an old pad or wood block, so you don't damage the caliper and it will help distribute the force. Slowly tighten the clamp, so that the pistons are pressed back into the caliper bores. Once the pads are free from the rotor, completely remove the guide pin bolts and remove the caliper. You may find that you can remove the old pads without removing the caliper, but it is suggested removing the caliper to inspect all parts and prepare for proper re-installation.
  2. To decompress the pistons after removing the caliper, completely remove the guide pin bolts. Pivot the caliper to remove it from the rotor. Use a brake reset tool to decompress the caliper piston into the caliper bores. This tool is easy to use and is adjustable for all caliper/piston sizes and made so that you will not damage the caliper.
Figure 3. Compressing the pistons with a c-clamp.

Pro Tips

  • Do not let the caliper hang because it creates tension on the brake line. You can either secure the caliper using a wire or rope to hang without tension or rest it on a box/crate under the car.
  • A brake reset tool is free to rent for a day at most major auto stores like Autozone.

Step 11 – Remove the caliper bolts and slide the caliper from the brake rotor

Using the 15 mm socket and either the 16 mm wrench (rear) or 18 mm wrench (front), remove the caliper bolts and slide the caliper off the brake disc. Support the brake caliper using a plastic zip tie or wire in between one of the holes, but do NOT let the caliper hang free using only the flexible rubber brake line. Once the caliper is removed, using the 13/16" socket, remove the caliper bracket bolts. These bolts have Loctite on them from the factory and may require some force and a breaker bar to remove.

Figure 2. Remove the caliper bolts and slide the caliper out.

Step 12 – Remove the old pads

Remove spring or retainer and the old pads from the caliper by simply pulling them out. Make note of the location of the pads in regards to the retainer.

Figure 4. Remove the old pads.

Pro Tip

Taking a picture with your cell phone is a great way to document components and their positions to insure proper re-installation.

Step 13 – Install the new pads and retainer

At this point, inspect all brake parts and use brake cleaner to clean the system of dust or debris. Before installing the new the pads, apply brake lube (dry film) to the the backing plate of the new pads.

Mount the new retainer and pads to the caliper. Make sure that the friction side of the new pads faces the rotor (both inboard and outboard). Make sure to position the pad wear sensor, located on the inboard pad, so that it is in the trailing position as the brake pad wears and moves forward toward the rotor.

Figure 5. Mount the new retainer and pads to the caliper.

Pro Tip

Do not allow lubricant to contact the rotor or face of the pads. This is important as friction creates stopping power and lubricant will decrease friction. Also, do not overdo it as excess lubricant may drip onto those parts.

Step 14 – Remove disc

If still present from the factory, remove the spring washers from the wheel studs using a flat screwdriver and discard as these will not have to be reused. At this point the disc should slide freely over the wheel studs; some light tapping on the rear with a hammer may be necessary.

  • Figure 3. Indication of a bad brake disc.
  • Figure 4. Remove the disc.

Step 15 – Install new discs and attach brake caliper bracket and caliper

At this point, it's time to install the new brake disc. Be sure to inspect the wheel bearing flange for rust or debris and, if necessary, clean. Slide the new disc over the wheel studs and clean any fingerprints or grease from the disc using brake cleaner. Next, re-install the caliper mounting bracket using Loctite and torque to 125 ft/lbs. Finally, position the caliper back into the caliper bracket ensuring that the brake pads have remained in place and that there aren't any fingerprints or grease on the face of the brake pads. Use Loctite on the caliper bolts as well and torque to 23 ft/lbs.

Figure 5. A new disc installed.

Step 16 – Install the caliper in place

Guide the caliper assembly over the rotor. At this point, you may find that you have to decompress the caliper piston further to allow for the thicker new pads. Do this using the C-clamp method (taking precaution not to damage the caliper) or use the reset tool. Attach the brake caliper guide pin bolts and tighten.

Step 17 – Re-install wheels and lower vehicle

Re-install the wheel and torque the lug nuts to 100 ft/lbs. Using the jack, raise the vehicle and remove the jack stands, then slowly lower the vehicle back down to the ground. Before driving the vehicle, it's a good idea to start the engine and pump the brake pedal a few times to re-seat the brake pads.

Figure 6. Torque to 100 ft/lbs.

How To: Jack Up C5 C6 C7 Corvette

Choosing the best procedure and support locations to lift your Corvette depends entirely on the project at hand. Of course, you will need to consider work space and safety for you as well as your car. Anytime your are jacking up your car, safety is of utmost importance. This guide will help you to safely jack up your Corvette on the correct jacking locations. Always use a flat hard surface. Put your vehicle in Park (automatic) or First/Reverse (manual) and set the parking brake.

Materials Needed

  • 2-ton floor jack(s) with a 2.5" saddle/pad
  • Cross beam adapter(s)
  • 2-ton jack stands (2-4)
  • Jack/lift pucks (2-4)
Figure 1. Support location diagram.

Step 1 – Chock the front wheels

Before lifting the vehicle, it's important to "chock" the wheels on the opposite end. Basically, this means slipping some kind of blockage behind the tires to prevent the vehicle from rolling. People frequently use whatever they can get their hands on: cinder blocks, chunks of wood, or bricks are all fair game. If you don't have access to any of these, chocks can be bought from any auto parts store.

Step 2 – Prepare the floor jack

Attach a cross beam adapter to your floor jack. A cross beam adapter allows you to jack up the vehicle at the exact support locations. Using a floor jack alone or using another material is dangerous. It may also cause damage to other vehicle components because the load is being applied to areas other than the proper support locations. Never directly jack your vehicle from the center of this cross beam adapter.

Figure 2. Cross beam adapter.

Step 3 – Position the floor jack under the cross beam adaptor

Make sure that the pads of the adapter will be contacting the support locations as you raise the jack.

Figure 3. Align adapter pads to support locations.

Step 4 – Jack up the car

Pay attention as you slowly and carefully raise the vehicle. Make sure that the pads are contacting the correct support areas and that no other components are being compromised. Stop when you have reached a height that allows for the introduction of jack stands.

Figure 4. Adapter pads in contact with exact support locations.

Step 5 – Place jack stands

Jack stand locations, which are under the cross beam adapter, should directly correspond with the preferred support locations currently aligned with the adapter pads.

Figure 5. Jack stand locations.

Pro Tip

At this time you can also place jack stands on the two frame contact locations, which are slightly forward of the rear wheels. If you use these locations, be sure to use lift/jack pucks at each location.

Step 6 – Rest the vehicle on the stands

Carefully and slowly lower the floor jack just enough, so that the jack stands bear the weight of the vehicle.

Pro Tip

Keep the floor jack attached, in place and in contact with the adapter assembly for added safety.

How To: Compression Test

Tools Needed:

  1. Ratchet wrench.
  2. 5/8'' spark plug Socket.
  3. Extensions for the ratchet wrench.
  4. Motor oil (for the ‘Wet’ compression test part).
  5. Spark plug wire puller.
  6. Compression Tester
  1. Disable the fuel system. You can easily do this by simply: 

    Removing the fuse labeled INJ 1, which is a 15 A fuse in the underhood fuse block. 

    Or disconnecting the fuel injectors from their electrical connectors. 

    Or, disconnecting the fuel pump relay. 

    This step is important, so don't skip it.

  2. Disable the ignition system. You can easily do this by simply: 

    Removing the fuse labeled INJ 1, which is a 15 A fuse in the underhood fuse block (this fuse feeds the fuel injectors and the COP coils with power). 

    Or disconnect the COP coils from their electrical connectors. 

    This step is important since it will prevent damage to the ignition coils, so don't skip it.

  3. Remove all 8 spark plugs. As your taking them out, be careful and don't drop any of them on the floor, or you could cause the spark plug’s ceramic insulator to break, and this will cause a misfire!

  4. Install the compression tester. Thread the engine compression gauge into the spark plug hole for the number 1 engine cylinder. Hand tighten the compression gauge only! Do not use any type of tool to get it tight.

  5. When ready, crank the engine... as you observe the needle on the compression tester's gauge. Once the needle on the gauge stops climbing, have your helper stop cranking the engine. 

  6. Write down the compression value. Record this compression reading on a piece of paper. Include the number of the cylinder this reading belongs to. Now repeat steps 1 thru' 6 on the other cylinders.

  7. Interpret the results. After testing all cylinders and having written down all of your compression test readings, now you need to interpret the results...

Interpreting The Results Of The Engine Compression Test

CASE 1: If you got a reading of 100 PSI or less (less being 0 PSI) on all of the cylinders you tested, you've got serious engine mechanical problems.

It's absolutely rare for the engine to get to the point of 0 PSI compression on all cylinders, but if it were to, this would usually means a broken timing chain.

What is common, if you have a very high mileage engine... is low compression across the board. Low usually means anything under 120 PSI (although the service manual says 100 PSI is the minimum). If your engine has reached this point, it's also smoking from the quart of oil it's burning every few days. The other symptoms you'll see is that the idle will be very rough.

CASE 2: One or two cylinders gave a low compression value. This might be normal, since each cylinder will not give the exact same pressure value.

What is NOT normal if the pressures vary by 15% or more. That's right, the individual cylinder compression readings of each engine cylinder can not vary more than 15% and this is how you can find out:

  1. Grab a calculator and multiply the highest compression reading that you recorded by .15. 

    Let's use the following compression readings to explain the point:
    1. Cylinder #1 175 PSI.
    2. Cylinder #2 160 PSI.
    3. Cylinder #3 165 PSI .
    4. Cylinder #4 95 PSI.
    5. Cylinder #5 160 PSI.
    6. Cylinder #6 165 PSI .
    7. Cylinder #7 170 PSI .
    8. Cylinder #8 165 PSI .
  2. The next step is to do the math: 175 x .15= 26, 175-26= 149.
  3. So then, 149 PSI is the lowest possible compression reading that any one of the rest of the engine cylinders can have. Any compression reading below this and that engine cylinder will misfire.
  4. This means that cylinder #4 is the one causing the misfire

The next step is to do a ‘Wet’ compression test on the dead or low compression cylinder.

A ‘Wet’ compression test will help you to find out if the low cylinder pressure or pressures you recorded in the ‘Dry’ compression test are caused by worn piston rings or worn cylinder head valves.

The ‘Wet’ compression test is done exactly the same as the ‘Wet’ compression test, the only major and significant change is that you'll add a small amount of engine oil (about 1-2 teaspoons) to the cylinder, that had low compression, to create temporarily seal.

Depending on whether the compression pressure rises (on your compression tester) or not, you'll be able to say that the problem lies in the piston's rings or in the cylinder head valves.

OK, this is what you need to do:

  1. Add a small amount of engine oil to the cylinder that reported low compression or no compression in the ‘Dry’ compression test. 

    The amount should be about 1 to 2 tablespoons of oil.

  2. Install the compression tester onto the cylinder. 

    Do not use any type of tool to tightened the compression tester... hand tight is fine.

  3. When all is set up, have your helper crank the engine.

  4. You'll get one of two results, either the compression value will go up (from the one you recorded before) or it will stay the same.

Let's take a look at what your test results mean:

CASE 1: The compression value shot up.. This tells you that the piston compression rings are worn out and thus the problem is in the bottom end.

If you're wondering why the compression value shot up, it's because the engine oil that you added (to this low compression cylinder) helped the piston compression rings seal the compression within the cylinder. The end result being that your compression test gauge registered a higher compression value.

CASE 2: The compression value stayed the same.. This confirms that the problem is in the cylinder head valves.

No, if you're wondering why this means that the cylinder head valves are worn, here's the answer: It's due to the fact that engine oil can not help worn cylinder head valves seal the compression within the cylinder. So, if the compression value did not shoot up (from the result obtained in TEST 1), then you can conclude that the problem is in the cylinder head valves of that dead cylinder.

How To: Leak Down Test

Tools Required

J 35667-A Cylinder Leakdown Tester

With the use of air pressure, a cylinder leakage test will aid in the diagnosis. The cylinder leakage test may be used in conjunction with the engine compression test, to isolate the cause of leaking cylinders.

  1. Remove the battery ground (negative) cable. Refer to

Caution

Before servicing any electrical component, the ignition key must be in the OFF or LOCK position and all electrical loads must be OFF, unless instructed otherwise in these procedures. If a tool or equipment could easily come in contact with a live exposed electrical terminal, also disconnect the negative battery cable. Failure to follow these precautions may cause personal injury and/or damage to the vehicle or its components.

in General Information.

  1. Remove the spark plugs. Refer to Ignition System.
  2. Install the J 35667-A .
  3. Measure each cylinder on the compression stroke, with both valves closed.

Important

It may be necessary to hold the crankshaft balancer bolt, to prevent piston movement.

  1. Apply air pressure, using the J 35667-A . Refer to the manufacturer's instructions.
  2. Record the cylinder leakage readings for each cylinder.

Important

    • Normal cylinder leakage is from 12 to 18 percent.
    • Make a note of any cylinder with more leakage than the other cylinders.
    • Any cylinder with 30 percent leakage or more requires service.
    • Inspect the four primary areas, to properly diagnose a leaking cylinder.
    • If air is heard from the intake or exhaust system, perform the following procedure:
    • Remove the valve rocker arm cover of the suspect cylinder head.
      • Ensure that both valves are closed.
      • Inspect the cylinder head for a broken valve spring.
    • Remove the suspect cylinder head and inspect. 
    • If air is heard from the crankcase system at the crankcase (oil filler tube), perform the following procedure:
    • Remove the piston from the suspect cylinder.
    • Inspect the piston and connecting rod assembly.
    • Inspect the engine block.
    • If bubbles are found in the radiator, perform the following procedure:
    • Remove both cylinder heads and inspect. 
    • Inspect the engine block.
    • Remove the J 35667-A .
    • Install the spark plugs. Refer to Ignition System.
    • Install the battery ground (negative) cable. Refer to Battery.

     

    Bad Rings: air will blow through the oil filler when performing the leak-down.

    Bad Intake Valve: air will blow through the throttle body when performing the leak-down.

    Bad Exhaust Valve: air will blow through the tailpipe when performing the leak-down.

    How To: Bleed Brakes

    Step 1: Jack up your car and put on jack stands.

    Step 2: Remove your tires so you can get to the bleeder valves on the calipers.

    Step 3: Open your hood and take the cap off your brake reservoir.

    Step 4: Take a turkey baster or something similar and suck out as much of the old fluid as possible. Then refill with new, fresh brake fluid. This will reduce the amount of contamination of the new with the old as possible.

    Step 5: Take a few rags, or some kind of catch basin/cup and put it underneath the bleeder valve

    Step 6: Get a length of 3/16" clear tubing, usually about $.10 a foot at a hardware store.

    Step 7: At the driver's rear caliper, attach the clear hose to the bleeder screw and the other end into a glass jar.

    Step 8: Have a buddy pump the brake pedal a few times and hold pressure on the pedal.

     Step 9: Open the bleeder screw and note the color and consistency of the fluid. Also look for any air bubbles. If you open the bleeder screw too far, you will get air from around the threads. So about 1/4 turn is all you need.

    Step 10: Once the brake pedal in on the floor, hold it there while you close he bleeder screw.

    Step 11: Have your buddy once again pump the pedal till hard and hold.

    Step 12: Repeat for about 10 cycles on the bleeder valve and refill the master cylinder.

     

    Right Rear go to Left Rear

     Go to Steps 5-12

     

    Left Rear go to Right Front

    Go to Steps 5-12

     

     

     

    Right Front go to Left Front

    Go to Steps 5-12

     

     

     

    Left Front

    Go to Step 13

    Step 13: Then move BACK to the right rear and repeat through all 4 corners till you get a solid stream of clean brake fluid at all calipers.

     

    Note: Use all your brake fluid in the bottle. Once opened, brake fluid has a VERY short shelf life.

    How To: Cam Swap LS Engines

    LS Cam Swap How-To:

    Servicing a camshaft in any overhead-valve engine requires a degree of disassembly, but in the case of GM’s LS-series of engines, the task is a bit less tedious, since there is no need to remove the intake manifold, upper engine cover or lifters. Here we’ll explain the process.

    1. Remove both valve covers.

    2. Remove all rocker arms.

    3. Remove the following components:

    • Water pump

    • Crankshaft pulley

    • Oil filter

    • Oil pan

    • Front engine cover (timing cover)

    • Oil pickup tube/screen assembly

    • Oil pump

    • Oil pump drive gear (slides off of the crank snout)

     

    As this example of a bare LS block shows, there’s no access to the lifters at the top valley. The lifters are located in the upper deck areas of the block and are held captive by the cylinder head. When removing or installing a cam, there’s no need to remove the heads either.
    <p>As this example of a bare LS block shows, there&rsquo;s no access to the lifters at the top valley. The lifters are located in the upper deck areas of the block and are held captive by the cylinder head. When removing or installing a cam, there&rsquo;s no need to remove the heads either.</p>

     

    4. Rotate the crankshaft two full turns (360 degrees), and position the crank gear and cam sprocket dots (cam gear dot at 6-o’clock and crank gear dot at 12-o’clock). Once positioned, DO NOT rotate the crankshaft at any time during the process. (By rotating the crank two full turns, this causes the camshaft lobes to push the lifters up into the plastic lifter buckets. With no valve spring pressure, since the rockers have been removed, the lifters will “snug” into the lifter buckets, holding the lifters up and away from the camshaft, allowing a clear path for camshaft removal without the need to remove the lifters. Note that in order to remove the lifters, the cylinder heads must be removed. This feature (lifters secured in the buckets) avoids the need to remove the heads). There is no need to remove the intake manifold or the upper engine cover plate. There is no access to the lifters at the top valley, and there’s no need to remove the lifters anyway.

     

    This view shows the timing setup (with pulley, water pump, front cover and oil pump removed). Depending on the version of the oil pump drive gear, this might incorporate the crank gear or it may be a separate gear.
    <p>This view shows the timing setup (with pulley, water pump, front cover and oil pump removed). Depending on the version of the oil pump drive gear, this might incorporate the crank gear or it may be a separate gear.</p>

     

    5. Remove the camshaft sprocket and timing chain.

    6. Remove the camshaft retaining plate.

    7. The camshaft is now ready for extraction. However, even though the lifters are being held out of the way in their respective buckets, there is still a chance for one or more lifters to accidentally fall out, which would then require cylinder head removal in order to retrieve the lifter(s). In order to avoid this potential problem, carefully insert a pair of 1/4-inch or 5/16-inch-diameter metal rods into the lifter oil galley passages (one rod into the oil galley on each side of the camshaft bore). Use rods that are about 28 inches long (or longer). This serves as a backup. In case a lifter tries to fall, the rod will stop it and keep the lifter engaged in its bucket’s flat registers (keeping the lifter in proper alignment). Leave these rods in place until the new camshaft has been installed.

     

    After rotating the crankshaft two full turns with the rocker arms removed, the cam lobes have pushed the roller lifters up into their guide buckets, which provides a clear unobstructed path for cam removal or installation. As a safety precaution, once the camshaft retainer plate has been removed, insert a pair of clean metal rods through the two lifter oil galleys. If one or more lifters accidentally fall out of the “locked” position, the rods will prevent the lifter from dropping into the path of the cam. Leave the rods in place until the new camshaft has been installed
    <p>After rotating the crankshaft two full turns with the rocker arms removed, the cam lobes have pushed the roller lifters up into their guide buckets, which provides a clear unobstructed path for cam removal or installation. As a safety precaution, once the camshaft retainer plate has been removed, insert a pair of clean metal rods through the two lifter oil galleys. If one or more lifters accidentally fall out of the &ldquo;locked&rdquo; position, the rods will prevent the lifter from dropping into the path of the cam. Leave the rods in place until the new camshaft has been installed</p>

     

    8. Using a suitable camshaft removal/installation tool/handle, carefully remove the camshaft and avoid dragging the lobes across the cam bearings. Again, proceed slowly and carefully. Scraping a cam bearing will result in a severe oil pressure drop and will require bearing replacement.

    9. Before installing the replacement camshaft, coat all cam journals with either clean engine oil or an engine assembly lube. Coat all cam lobes either with clean engine oil or a high-pressure lubricant designed for camshaft break-in. Even though the LS engines feature roller lifters, it never hurts to use a quality high-pressure lubricant.

     

    Before installing the fresh camshaft, clean thoroughly to remove any protective film or grease that may have been applied at the factory, and coat journals and lobes liberally with a quality camshaft or engine assembly lubricant. Even though a roller style camshaft doesn’t face the same potential harm as a flat-tappet cam during break-in, a high pressure cam lube still isn’t a bad idea. Unlike a flat-tappet cam, a roller cam/roller lifter setup really doesn’t face a “break-in” issue.
    <p>Before installing the fresh camshaft, clean thoroughly to remove any protective film or grease that may have been applied at the factory, and coat journals and lobes liberally with a quality camshaft or engine assembly lubricant. Even though a roller style camshaft doesn&rsquo;t face the same potential harm as a flat-tappet cam during break-in, a high pressure cam lube still isn&rsquo;t a bad idea. Unlike a flat-tappet cam, a roller cam/roller lifter setup really doesn&rsquo;t face a &ldquo;break-in&rdquo; issue.</p>

     

    10. Remove the two temporary metal rods from the lifter oil galleys.

     

    A dedicated camshaft “handle” will provide a secure grip and added leverage to remove or install the camshaft. This Trick Flow camshaft grip features a somewhat universal bolt pattern and will accept an LS camshaft.
    <p>A dedicated camshaft &ldquo;handle&rdquo; will provide a secure grip and added leverage to remove or install the camshaft. This Trick Flow camshaft grip features a somewhat universal bolt pattern and will accept an LS camshaft.</p>

     

    11. By hand, push each pushrod fully downward in order to dislodge the lifters from their buckets, allowing each lifter to contact its cam lobe.

     

    Always install a new camshaft retainer plate on any LS service. The printed sealing bead may have hardened over time. An LS gasket set usually includes a new retainer plate.
    <p>Always install a new camshaft retainer plate on any LS service. The printed sealing bead may have hardened over time. An LS gasket set usually includes a new retainer plate.</p>

     

    12. Install a NEW camshaft retainer plate. The imprinted sealant on the rear of the plate tends to harden over time, so it’s recommended to always use a new retainer plate. Depending on the version of the engine, the retainer plate bolts may feature a hex head or a Torx head. Hex head bolts are tightened to 18 ft.-lbs., while Torx bolts are tightened to 11 ft.-lbs. In either case, I prefer to apply a drop of medium thread locking compound to all bolt threads prior to installation.

    With the new camshaft in place (and with the temporary metal rods removed), install the retainer plate and tighten the fasteners to specification. If the retainer plate bolts feature hex heads, tighten to 18 ft.-lbs. If there are Torx heads, tighten to 11 ft.-lbs. Apply thread locker beforehand.
    <p>With the new camshaft in place (and with the temporary metal rods removed), install the retainer plate and tighten the fasteners to specification. If the retainer plate bolts feature hex heads, tighten to 18 ft.-lbs. If there are Torx heads, tighten to 11 ft.-lbs. Apply thread locker beforehand.</p>

     

    Also apply thread locker to the camshaft sprocket bolts and torque to 18 ft.-lbs.
    <p>&nbsp;Also apply thread locker to the camshaft sprocket bolts and torque to 18 ft.-lbs.</p>

     

    13. Install the camshaft sprocket and timing chain, aligning the timing dots. Tighten the cam sprocket bolts to 18 ft.-lbs. (with thread locker).

    14. Install the rocker arms, tightening all rocker arm bolts to 22 ft.-lbs. NOTE: The intake rocker arm bolt holes in the cylinder heads are open to the intake runners. Apply a thread sealer to all INTAKE rocker arm bolts before installation.

     

    When installing the rocker arms, be aware that the intake rocker bolt holes are open to the intake runners. Always apply thread sealant to the intake rocker bolts.
    <p>When installing the rocker arms, be aware that the intake rocker bolt holes are open to the intake runners. Always apply thread sealant to the intake rocker bolts.</p>

     

    15. Install the oil pump drive gear onto the crank snout (depending on the version, this may incorporate the crank gear, in which case you’ve already installed it during the timing chain installation, or it may be a separate radius-toothed gear that slides on after the crank gear).

    16. Install the oil pump to the block (aligning the pump’s floating driven gear to engage onto the drive gear). Install the oil pump-to-block bolts finger tight. Using a feeler gauge, do your best to center the pump relative to the crank snout drive gear (there’s a small bit of slop in the pump’s mounting bolt holes). Then tighten the pump bolts to 18 ft.-lbs.

     

    Before fully tightening the oil pump to block mounting bolts, try to center the oil pump relative to the crank snout (the mounting bolt holes provide a small bit of play).
    <p>Before fully tightening the oil pump to block mounting bolts, try to center the oil pump relative to the crank snout (the mounting bolt holes provide a small bit of play).</p>

     

    17. Install the oil pickup assembly, using a new O-ring on the end of the pickup tube where it engages into the oil pump (lube the O-ring with oil first). Engage the pickup tube bracket onto the main stud and install the nut finger-tight. Next, torque the 6 mm bolt that secures the pickup tube to the oil pump at 106 in.-lbs. Then tighten the pickup tube bracket at the main stud to 18 to 20 ft.-lbs.

    18. Install the front engine cover, using a new gasket (metal core gasket with an imprinted sealing bead). Initially, install the cover bolts finger-tight. Place a straightedge along the block’s oil pan rail, across the bottom of the front cover in order to verify that the cover’s bottom surface is flush with the oil pan rail. Tighten the front cover bolts to 18 ft.-lbs.

    19. Clean the oil pan thoroughly. The oil pan gaskets feature an imprinted elastomer sealing bead and may be reusable, but I recommend installing a new gasket. Before installing the oil pan gasket, apply a small bead of RTV along the joint where the bottom of the front cover meets the block. Install the oil pan gasket and oil pan, tightening the 8 mm bolts to 18 ft.-lbs., and the 6 mm bolts to 106 in.-lbs.

    20. Install the crankshaft pulley by drawing the pulley onto the crank snout, using a harmonic balancer installation tool that features a 16 mm x 2.0 thread. NEVER try to force any balancer or pulley into place by striking it with a hammer or other impact tool. Refer to the information on page 46 regarding crankshaft pulley bolts.

     

    As mentioned earlier, depending on the design, the drive gear that rides on the crank snout may be a separate piece to be slid on after the timing chain, or it may be a one-piece unit incorporating both the crank chain gear and the oil pump drive gear.
    <p>As mentioned earlier, depending on the design, the drive gear that rides on the crank snout may be a separate piece to be slid on after the timing chain, or it may be a one-piece unit incorporating both the crank chain gear and the oil pump drive gear.</p>

     

    21. Once the crank pulley has been installed, install the water pump using two new gaskets. These are aluminum cores with imprinted sealing beads. Even though the old gaskets may appear to be usable, don’t risk it. Install new gaskets. Tighten the water pump bolts in two steps: first tighten all bolts at 11 ft.-lbs., and then at 22 ft.-lbs., tightening in a crisscross manner to spread the clamping load.

    22. Finish assembly (belt, valve covers, etc.). Fill a new engine oil filter with the appropriate oil, install the filter and add the appropriate amount of oil to the sump per the specific engine’s specs.

    Crankshaft pulley bolt

    The LS crankshaft snouts feature a 16 mm x 2.0 thread size. When installing the crank pulley, you have two choices in terms of the pulley bolt: the OE TTY (torque to yield) bolt, or the ARP bolt. My recommendation is to use the ARP bolt.

    When using an OE bolt, you must follow a more tedious process, and you’ll need two of these bolts. First (after making sure that the crank female threads are clean), position the pulley onto the crank snout. Install an OE bolt and tighten to a value of 240 ft.-lbs.

    This OE specification is required in order to fully seat the pulley. Next, remove the OE bolt and discard it (it’s a TTY bolt and cannot be reused). Install a new OE bolt and tighten to 37 ft.-lbs., followed by an additional 140-degree turn. The OE bolt requires this torque-plus-angle method. This is tedious, and requires that the crankshaft does NOT rotate during the angle tightening.

    The ARP bolt is a high-quality bolt with a high tensile strength, and does not require a torque-plus-angle approach.

    Simply lube the bolt threads and the underside of the bolt head with ARP’s engine assembly lube, slip on the provided hardened washer and torque to a final value of 235 ft.-lbs. (You must use this moly lube in order to achieve the desired torque value. Do not use engine oil.)

    Granted, the ARP bolt is more expensive than the OE bolt, but it’s more dependable, much easier to install (no torque/angle process to mess with), and does not require a “donor” bolt for initial tightening. This bolt can be reused during future service, unlike the OE bolt.

    NOTE: All wet-sump LS engines (LS1, LS6, LS2, LQ4, LQ9, etc.) require a 16 mm x 2.0 bolt that features a shank length of 4.325 inches. All dry sump LS engines (LS7, etc.) require a longer 5.225-inch bolt to accommodate the pump drive.

    If purchasing the ARP bolt, the part number for the wet sump engines is 234-2503. The dry sump engines require P/N 234-2504.

     

    Note that the vehicle’s oil pump’s pickup tube engages into the oil pump inlet.
    <p>Note that the vehicle&rsquo;s oil pump&rsquo;s pickup tube engages into the oil pump inlet.</p>

     

    The pickup tube features a single-bolt mounting bracket, secured with a 6 mm bolt. Tighten this bolt to 106 in.-lbs.
    <p>The pickup tube features a single-bolt mounting bracket, secured with a 6 mm bolt. Tighten this bolt to 106 in.-lbs.</p>

     

    The pickup tube’s screen end features a bracket that attaches to a stud tip at a main cap location. The nut should be a locking style.
    <p>The pickup tube&rsquo;s screen end features a bracket that attaches to a stud tip at a main cap location. The nut should be a locking style.</p>

     

    ARP crank pulley bolt, 235 ft.-lbs. (with ARP moly)

    Camshaft retainer bolts (Torx), 11 ft.-lbs.

    Camshaft sprocket bolts, 18 ft.-lbs.

    Oil pump pickup tube to main stud nut, 18 to 20 ft.-lbs.

    Oil pump pickup to oil pump bolt, 106 in.-lbs.

    Oil pump to block bolts, 18 ft.-lbs.

    Front engine cover bolts, 18 ft.-lbs.

    Oil pan 6 mm bolts, 106 in.-lbs.

    Oil pan 8 mm bolts, 18 ft.-lbs.

    Oil pan drain plug, 18 ft.-lbs.

    Water pump bolts, 11 ft.-lbs., then 22 ft.-lbs.

    Rocker arm bolts, 22 ft.-lbs. ●

     

    A view of the oil pump, pickup and windage tray. Even if you haven’t disturbed the windage tray, take a moment to make sure that it’s not dented, to verify that the tray clears the crank and big ends of the connecting rods.
    <p>A view of the oil pump, pickup and windage tray. Even if you haven&rsquo;t disturbed the windage tray, take a moment to make sure that it&rsquo;s not dented, to verify that the tray clears the crank and big ends of the connecting rods.</p>

     

     

    Temporarily installing a pair of 8 mm x 1.25 studs in the block front aids in positioning the front engine cover and its gasket.

    Torque the front cover bolts in a crisscross manner to spread the clamping load evenly. Tighten the 8 mm bolts to 18 ft.-lbs.
    <p>Torque the front cover bolts in a crisscross manner to spread the clamping load evenly. Tighten the 8 mm bolts to 18 ft.-lbs.</p>

     

     

    Before installing the oil pan gasket and the oil pan, apply a small bead of RTV along the exposed gasketed joint between the front cover and the block. Be sure to thoroughly clean the oil pan prior to mounting.
    <p>Before installing the oil pan gasket and the oil pan, apply a small bead of RTV along the exposed gasketed joint between the front cover and the block. Be sure to thoroughly clean the oil pan prior to mounting.</p>

     

     

    Instead of using the torque-to-yield one-time-use original equipment crank pulley bolt that requires a donor bolt and a torque/angle tightening method, a better choice is an ARP pulley bolt. Lube it, install and torque to 235 ft.-lbs. Also, the ARP bolt is reusable.

    <p>Instead of using the torque-to-yield one-time-use original equipment crank pulley bolt that requires a donor bolt and a torque/angle tightening method, a better choice is an ARP pulley bolt. Lube it, install and torque to 235 ft.-lbs. Also, the ARP bolt is reusable.</p><p>&nbsp;</p>

     

    Draw the pulley onto the crankshaft snout using an installation tool that features a long 16 mm x 2.0 thread. Never try to hammer the pulley into position. By the way, original equipment LS crank pulleys are not clock-position sensitive and feature no locating key. They depend only on a tight interference fit.
    <p>Draw the pulley onto the crankshaft snout using an installation tool that features a long 16 mm x 2.0 thread. Never try to hammer the pulley into position. By the way, original equipment LS crank pulleys are not clock-position sensitive and feature no locating key. They depend only on a tight interference fit.</p>

     

     

    Always use new water pump gaskets. They feature an aluminum core and printed sealing bead. They’re inexpensive and even though they may seem reusable, why take a chance?
    <p>Always use new water pump gaskets. They feature an aluminum core and printed sealing bead. They&rsquo;re inexpensive and even though they may seem reusable, why take a chance?</p>

     

     

    <p>Temporarily installing a pair of 8 mm x 1.25 studs in the block front aids in positioning the front engine cover and its gasket.</p>

    Videos

    Torque Specs

    LS Specs
    ls spark order
    ls firing order
    ls head torq sequence
    Intake Manifold Bolt Specs
    Part
    Spec
    Accelerator Control Cable Bracket Bolts 89 in lb
    Air Conditioning Compressor Bolts 37 ft lb
    Air Conditioning Compressor Bracket Bolts 37 ft lb
    Air Conditioning Idler Pulley Bolt 37 ft lb
    Air Conditioning Tensioner Bolt 18 ft lb
    Air Injection Reaction (AIR) Pipe-to-Exhaust Manifold Bolts 15 ft lb
    Camshaft Retainer Bolts 18 ft lb
    Camshaft Sensor Bolt 18 ft lb
    Camshaft Sprocket Bolts 26 ft lb
    Catalytic Converter Nut 18 ft lb
    Connecting Rod Bolts - First Design (First Pass) 15 ft lb
    Connecting Rod Bolts - First Design (Final Pass) 60 degrees
    Connecting Rod Bolts - Second Design (First Pass) 15 ft lb
    Connecting Rod Bolts - Second Design (Final Pass) 75 degrees
    Coolant Temperature Gauge Sensor 15 ft lb
    Crankshaft Balancer Bolt (Installation Pass-to Ensure the Balancer is Completely Installed) 240 ft lb
    Crankshaft Balancer Bolt (First Pass-Install a NEW Bolt After the Installation Pass and Tighten as Described in the First and Final Passes) 37 ft lb
    Crankshaft Balancer Bolt (Final Pass) 140 degrees
    Crankshaft Bearing Cap Bolts (Inner Bolts-First Pass in Sequence) 15 ft lb
    Crankshaft Bearing Cap Bolts (Inner Bolts-Final Pass in Sequence) 80 degrees
    Crankshaft Bearing Cap Side Bolts 18 ft lb
    Crankshaft Bearing Cap Studs (Outer Studs-First Pass in Sequence) 15 ft lb
    Crankshaft Bearing Cap Studs (Outer Studs-Final Pass in Sequence) 53 degrees
    Crankshaft Oil Deflector Nuts 18 ft lb
    Crankshaft Position Sensor Bolt 18 ft lb
    Cylinder Head Bolts (First Pass all M11 Bolts in Sequence) 22 ft lb
    Cylinder Head Bolts (Second Pass all M11 Bolts in Sequence) 90 degrees
    Cylinder Head Bolts (Final Pass all M11 Bolts in Sequence-Excluding the Medium Length Bolts at the Front and Rear of Each Cylinder Head) 90 degrees
    Cylinder Head Bolts (Final Pass M11 Medium Length Bolts at the Front and Rear of Each Cylinder Head in Sequence) 50 degrees
    Cylinder Head Bolts (M8 Inner Bolts in Sequence) 22 ft lb
    Cylinder Head Coolant Plug 15 ft lb
    Cylinder Head Core Hole Plug 15 ft lb
    Drive Belt Idler Pulley Bolt 37 ft lb
    Drive Belt Tensioner Bolts 37 ft lb
    Engine Block Coolant Drain Plugs 44 ft lb
    Engine Block Heater 30 ft lb
    Engine Block Oil Gallery Plugs 44 ft lb
    Engine Coolant Air Bleed Pipe Bolts and Studs 106 in lb
    Engine Crossmember Bolts (Large) 107 ft lb
    Engine Crossmember Bolts (Small) 92 ft lb
    Engine Flywheel Bolts (First Pass) 15 ft lb
    Engine Flywheel Bolts (Second Pass) 37 ft lb
    Engine Flywheel Bolts (Final Pass) 74 ft lb
    Engine Flywheel-to-Torque Converter Bolts 44 ft lb
    Engine Front Cover Bolts 18 ft lb
    Engine Mount Heat Shield Nuts 89 in lb
    Engine Mount Stud-to-Engine Block 37 ft lb
    Engine Mount Through Bolts 70 ft lb
    Engine Mount Through Bolt Nuts 59 ft lb
    Engine Mount-to-Engine Block Bolts 37 ft lb
    Engine Rear Cover Bolts 18 ft lb
    Engine Service Lift Bracket M10 Bolts 37 ft lb
    Engine Service Lift Bracket M8 Bolt 18 ft lb
    Engine Valley Cover Bolts 18 ft lb
    Engine Wire Harness Clip Bolt 37 ft lb
    Engine Wire Harness Ground Strap Bolt 37 ft lb
    Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) Valve Bolts (First Pass) 89 in lb
    EGR Valve Bolts (Final Pass) 22 ft lb
    EGR Valve Pipe-to-Cylinder Head Bolts 37 ft lb
    EGR Valve Pipe-to-Exhaust Manifold Bolts 22 ft lb
    EGR Valve Pipe-to-Intake Manifold Bolt 89 in lb
    Exhaust Manifold Bolts (First Pass) 11 ft lb
    Exhaust Manifold Bolts (Final Pass) 18 ft lb
    Exhaust Manifold Heat Shield Bolts 80 in lb
    Exhaust Manifold Pipe Nuts 26 ft lb
    Front Shock-to-Engine Crossmember Bolts 48 ft lb
    Fuel Injection Fuel Rail Bolts 89 in lb
    Generator Bracket Bolts 37 ft lb
    Generator Rear Bracket-to-Engine Block Bolt 18 ft lb
    Generator Rear Bracket-to-Generator Bolt 18 ft lb
    Ground Strap Bolt (at Rear of Cylinder Head) 37 ft lb
    Ignition Coil-to-Bracket Bolts 106 in lb
    Ignition Coil Bracket-to-Valve Rocker Arm Cover Bolts 106 in lb
    Intake Manifold Bolts (First Pass in Sequence) 44 ft lb
    Intake Manifold Bolts (Final Pass in Sequence) 89 in lb
    Knock Sensors 15 ft lb
    Oil Filter 22 ft lb
    Oil Filter Fitting 40 ft lb
    Oil Level Indicator Tube Bolt 18 ft lb
    Oil Level Sensor 115 in lb
    Oil Pan Baffle Bolts 106 in lb
    Oil Pan Closeout Cover Bolt (Left Side) 106 in lb
    Oil Pan Closeout Cover Bolt (Right Side) 106 in lb
    Oil Pan Cover Bolts 106 in lb
    Oil Pan Drain Plug 18 ft lb
    Oil Pan M8 Bolts (Oil Pan-to-Engine Block and Oil Pan-to-Front Cover) 18 ft lb
    Oil Pan M6 Bolts (Oil Pan-to-Rear Cover) 106 in lb
    Oil Pressure Sensor 15 ft lb
    Oil Pump-to-Engine Block Bolts 18 ft lb
    Oil Pump Cover Bolts 106 in lb
    Oil Pump Relief Valve Plug 106 in lb
    Oil Pump Screen Nuts 18 ft lb
    Oil Pump Screen-to-Oil Pump Bolt 106 in lb
    Oxygen Sensor 31 ft lb
    Positive Crankcase Ventilation (PCV) System Strap Nut (at Right Front Vapor Vent Pipe Stud) 106 in lb
    Power Steering Pump Bolts 18 ft lb
    Power Steering Pump Bracket Bolts 18 ft lb
    Spark Plugs (Cylinder Heads-New) 15 ft lb
    Spark Plugs (all Subsequent Installations) 11 ft lb
    Throttle Body Bolts 106 in lb
    Transmission Housing Bolt 37 ft lb
    Valve Lifter Guide Bolts 106 in lb
    Valve Rocker Arm Bolts 22 ft lb
    Valve Rocker Arm Cover Bolts 106 in lb
    Water Inlet Housing Bolts 11 ft lb
    Water Pump Bolts (First Pass) 11 ft lb
    Water Pump Bolts (Final Pass) 22 ft lb
    Water Pump Cover Bolts 11 ft lb


    4L60-E Transmission Torque Specs 
    Application
    Spec
    Accumulator Cover to Case Bolt 6-10 ft lb
    Case Extension to Case Bolt 31-35 ft lb
    Case Extension to Case Bolt (4WD Shipping) 8.3-16.7 ft lb
    Converter Cover Bolt 89 in lb
    Converter Housing to Case Screw 48-55 ft lb
    Cooler Pipe Connector 26-30 ft lb
    Detent Spring to Valve Body Bolt 15-20 ft lb
    Floorshift Control Bolt 89 in lb
    Flywheel to Torque Converter Bolt 46 ft lb
    Forward Accumulator Cover to Valve Body Bolt 6-10 ft lb
    Heat Shield to Transmission Bolt 13 ft lb
    Line Pressure Plug 6-10 ft lb
    Manual Shaft to Inside Detent Lever Nut 20-25 ft lb
    Negative Battery Cable Bolt 11 ft lb
    Oil Level Indicator Bolt 35 ft lb
    Oil Pan to Transmission Case Bolt 97 in lb
    Oil Passage Cover to Case Bolt 6-10 ft lb
    Park Brake Bracket to Case Bolt 20-25 ft lb
    Park/Neutral Position Switch Screw 27 in lb
    Plate to Case Bolt (Shipping) 20-25 ft lb
    Plate to Converter Bolt (Shipping) 20-25 ft lb
    Plug Assembly, Automatic Transmission Oil Pan (C/K) 22.1-29.5 ft lb
    Plug Assembly, Automatic Transmission Oil Pan (Y) 20.7-23.6 ft lb
    Pressure Control Solenoid Bracket to Valve Body Bolt 6-10 ft lb
    Pump Assembly to Case Bolt 19-24 ft lb
    Pump Cover to Pump Body Bolt 15-20 ft lb
    Shift Cable Grommet Screw 15 in lb
    Shift Control Cable Attachment 15 ft lb
    Speed Sensor Retainer Bolt 7.7-10 ft lb
    Stud, Automatic Transmission Case Extension (Y-car) 13-16 ft lb
    TCC Solenoid Assembly to Case Bolt 6-10 ft lb
    Trans Mount to Transmission Bolt 18 ft lb
    Transmission Fluid Pressure Manual Valve Position Switch to Valve Body Bolt 6-10 ft lb
    Transmission Oil Cooler Pipe Fitting 26-30 ft lb
    Transmission Oil Pan to Case Bolt 7-10 ft lb
    Transmission to Engine Bolt 35 ft lb
    Valve Body to Case Bolt 6-10 ft lb


    T-56 Transmission Torque Specs 
    Application
    Spec
    Backup Lamp Switch 20 ft lb
    Clutch Actuator Cylinder Bolt 71 in lb
    Clutch Housing Bolt 37 ft lb
    Control Lever Handle Bolt 18 ft lb
    Gear Select/Skip Shift Solenoid 30 ft lb
    Reverse Lockout Assembly Bolt 13 ft lb
    Reverse Lockout Solenoid 30 ft lb
    Shift Control Bolt 13 ft lb
    Shift Control Closeout Boot Bolt 18 in lb
    Shift Control Knob 27 ft lb
    Transmission Bolt 37 ft lb
    Transmission Drain/Fill Plug 20 ft lb
    Transmission Mount Bolt 38 ft lb
    Transmission Mount Nut 77 ft lb
    Transmission Support Bolt 66 ft lb
    Vehicle Speed Sensor Bolt 89 in lb


    Clutch Torque Specs 
    Application
    Spec
    Brake Pedal Pivot Nut 40 ft lb
    Clutch Actuator Cylinder Bolt 71 in lb
    Clutch Pressure Plate Bolt (5-Speed) 15 ft lb + 45 degrees
    Clutch Pressure Plate Bolt (6-Speed) 52 ft lb
    Clutch Master Cylinder Nut 15 ft lb
    Transmission Bolt (5-Speed) 55 in lb
    Transmission Bolt (6-Speed) 37 ft lb
    All content provided on this site is to be used as a suggestion only. Any damage to the vehicle or injury resulting from usage of these materials is 100% the users responsibility. Use of a professional mechanic is suggested if you do not feel comfortable with the instructions. Reproduction of any photography, work or otherwise herein is expressly prohibited without written permission from the publisher

    How-To